Worldwide Printers Hacked amidst the row between PewDewPie and T-Series

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YouTube is in a soup amidst an uproar of Internet-connected printers being hacked supposedly by the fans of Felix Kjellberg aka “PewDiePie.” The hacker has been deemed responsible for hacking into servers of different workplaces and urging people to subscribe to PewDiePie. The origin of the entire story began when Indian music industry giant T-Series’ Youtube subscribers count surpassed Kjellberg’s by 150,000. Following this, Kjellberg was seen pushing in more videos to make up for his lost royalty at YouTube.

The organic growth in subscribers and viewership of T-Series had threatened to overthrow PewDiePie and his domination over Youtube. There was a breach into internet-connected printers at workplaces which had a coded transcript asking people to subscribe to Pew Die Pie and in turn, unsubscribe to T- Series.

Worldwide Printers Hacked amidst the row between PewDewPie and T-SeriesThe latter, the transcript claimed, did no better than just upload trailers and music videos of Bollywood Movies. An ASCII code of the Brofist, a trademark symbol of Kjellberg was coded at the bottom of the transcript to sensationalize the whole issue probably.

Following this, the Twitter handles were flooded with pictures of related transcripts which was later confirmed by an anonymous hacker as his work. The hacker mentioned that this was just done at the heat of the moment and to raise awareness about the security of Internet Printer servers.

Apart from the security breach, Kjellberg fans have been trying to buy every billboard, radio, and television local advertisement spot in cities to root for his advertising campaign. Though this campaign was taken in good faith, the hacking frenzy has stretched a bit too far.

A Twitter user claimed that the particular transcript got printed on his pay-cheque as well. TheHackerGiraffe, the hacking team responsible for creating this panic contended that this was just a ploy to show the world the vulnerability of Internet-connected printers. These printers, they said, could be easily hacked by amateur hackers and cause physical damage.

Source – FragHero

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